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7 Facts You Didn’t Know About Women’s Cricket

7 Facts You Didn’t Know About Women’s Cricket

Women’s cricket has come a long way since the first Women’s Cricket World Cup was held in 1973. In the years since, women’s cricket has seen many milestones, including the first double century in Test and ODI cricket, the first woman to take a hat-trick in Test cricket, and the first Indian women’s cricket team to play an international match.

This article will explore some of the most significant milestones in the history of women’s cricket, from the first Women’s Cricket World Cup to the first Indian women’s cricket team to play an international match. It will also discuss the impact that these milestones have had on the development of women’s cricket.

When Was The First Women’s World Cup Played?

7 Facts You Didn't Know About Women's Cricket
Image Credit: Ken Kelly/Popperfoto via Getty Images/Getty Images

The inaugural Cricket Women’s World Cup took place in England from 20th June to 28th July 1973, making it the first-ever tournament of its kind. It preceded the men’s limited-overs World Cup by two years.

The competition featured seven teams, including England, Australia, New Zealand, Trinidad and Tobago, Jamaica, an International XI, and a Young England side. Employing a round-robin format, each team faced the others once, and the top two teams advanced to the final.

The hosts, England, emerged victorious in the tournament, defeating Australia in the final by 9 wickets. Enid Bakewell was the standout performer, showcasing her skills by scoring 264 runs and taking 12 wickets throughout the competition.

First Double Century in Women’s Test Cricket

7 Facts You Didn't Know About Women's Cricket
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The first women’s cricketer to score a double century in Test cricket was Kirsty Flavell of New Zealand. She scored 204 runs against England in the second Test of the 1996 Women’s Ashes series at Scarborough. Flavell’s innings lasted for 555 minutes and included 24 boundaries. She was eventually out to Australian bowler Karen Rolton.

Flavell’s double century was a major achievement in women’s game. It was the first time that a woman had scored 200 runs in a Test match, and it helped to raise the profile of the women’s game.

First Double Century in Women’s ODI Cricket

7 Facts You Didn't Know About Women's Cricket
Image Credit: Scott Barbour/ALLSPORT

Belinda Clark of Australia was the first women’s cricketer to score a double century in One Day Internationals. She scored 229 runs against Denmark at the M. Chinnaswamy Stadium in Bangalore on December 16, 1997.

Clark’s innings lasted for 155 balls and included 22 fours and 3 sixes. She was eventually out to Danish bowler Helle Nielsen.

Clark’s double century was a major achievement in women’s cricket. It was the first time that a woman had scored 200 runs in an ODI match, and it helped to raise the profile of the women’s game.

Clark is a true pioneer in women’s cricket. Her double century was a major achievement, and it helped to pave the way for future generations of women cricketers.

First Women’s Cricketer to Take a Hat-trick

7 Facts You Didn't Know About Women's Cricket
Image Credit: Ken Kelly/Popperfoto via Getty Images

Enid Bakewell was the first woman’s cricketer to take a hat-trick in Test cricket. She achieved the feat against Australia on 15 August 1976 at Headingley, Leeds.

Bakewell’s hat-trick was the first by any woman in any form of international cricket. She dismissed Jill Knight, Lyn Fullston, and Karen Rolton in consecutive deliveries.

Bakewell was a talented all-rounder who played for England from 1968 to 1985. She was a right-handed batter and a right-arm medium-pace bowler. She scored 2,640 runs in Test matches and 1,133 runs in One Day Internationals. She also took 121 wickets in Test matches and 87 wickets in One Day Internationals.

When Was The First Women’s Match Was Played?

7 Facts You Didn't Know About Women's Cricket
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The inaugural women’s Test match occurred in 1934, featuring England and Australia at Mitcham Cricket Ground in Surrey, England. Australia emerged victorious, securing a convincing win by an innings and 98 runs.

As for the first women’s One Day International (ODI) in 1973, England and Australia clashed at Edgbaston in Birmingham, England. England dominated the game, emerging triumphant with a 9-wicket victory.

When did Indian Women’s Team Played its First Cricket Match?

7 Facts You Didn't Know About Women's Cricket
Image Credit: Scott Barbour/ALLSPORT

In 1976, the Indian women’s cricket team played their inaugural match against West Indies at Bangalore’s M. Chinnaswamy Stadium, securing a 6-wicket victory. The team, led by Shantha Rangaswamy, who was also the first Indian woman to score a Test century, featured notable players like Lakshmibai Manjrekar, Sudha Shah, and Purnima Rau.

Since then, the team has made significant progress. They achieved a remarkable milestone by winning the Women’s Cricket World Cup in 2005 and have been runners-up three times. Furthermore, they hold an impressive record of 10 triumphs in the Women’s Asia Cup. Their journey showcases tremendous growth and success in women’s cricket.

When Did Women’s Cricketers Started Wearing Trousers?

7 Facts You Didn't Know About Women's Cricket
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In August 1997, during an ODI match between England and South Africa in Bristol, women cricketers made a significant change by donning trousers for the first time in an international match.

The England women’s team took the decision to switch to trousers, considering the practicality and comfort they offer while playing the game. Trousers allow greater freedom of movement, which proves advantageous during fielding and running between the wickets. Moreover, they are often perceived as more comfortable compared to skirts or dresses.

The history of women’s appearance in cricket is full of milestones that have helped to shape the game into what it is today. These milestones have not only inspired women to take up cricket, but they have also helped to raise the profile of the game and make it more accessible to women all over the world.

As women’s game continues to grow and develop, it is likely that we will see even more milestones in the years to come. These milestones will help to ensure that women’s cricket continues to thrive and that more and more women have the opportunity to play the game.

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